Capsule movie reviews to date

Lights Out (2016, Savannah Bloch)
Not Recommended
Well-made (particularly well-photographed by Cooper Ulrich) but ultimately pointless short about young mother Alixzandra Dove dealing with a naughty toddler who doesn’t want to go to bed. Dove’s okay, director Bloch’s okay; the writing does it in.
DVD, Streaming
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Henry Fool (1997, Hal Hartley)
★★★½
Obnoxious jerk Thomas Jay Ryan befriends (and exploits) introvert garbageman/unknown great American poet James Urbaniak, seducing his sister (a spectacular Parker Posey) but encouraging his writing. Very long, very difficult. The last act is truly phenomenal stuff.
DVD, Blu-ray.
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It Came from Outer Space (1953, Jack Arnold)
★½
Richard Carlson and Barbara Rush see a spaceship crash and can’t get anyone to believe them until it’s too late and the aliens start messing with the townsfolk. Arnold’s got a few big directing missteps (he races through every scene and doesn’t know how to compose shots on his sets). Simultaneously too short (at eighty minutes) and too long. Ray Bradbury wrote the original story treatment.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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It Happens Every Spring (1949, Lloyd Bacon)
★½
Ray Milland’s a college professor with a science-powered baseball who becomes a star pitcher. Paul Douglas is his catcher, Jean Peters is his girlfriend. Great performance from Douglas and some good writing can’t save the dull film. Milland’s disinterested and charmless, Peters is good but not in it enough to matter.
DVD, Streaming.
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The Killers (1946, Robert Siodmak)
★★½
Okay but overlong noir has insurance investigator Edmond O’Brien sure there’s more to his claim involving Burt Lancaster, Ava Gardner, and Albert Dekker. Flashbacks galore don’t add up to a good character arc for anyone involved. Ostensibly based on the Hemingway short story, but not really.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Perry Mason: The Case of the Sinister Spirit (1987, Richard Lang)

Satisfactory PERRY MASON TV movie has Raymond Burr, Barbara Hale, and William Katt in a haunted hotel. Perry (Burr) has to defend old pal Robert Stack (who phones it in). Actually good Kim Delaney figures into the suspect pool, along with annoyingly awful Dwight Schultz. Burr gets a lot to do but Hale doesn’t. An otherwise amiable Katt’s comes off bored with his Delaney flirtation. Rocky in parts, but goodwill (and Delaney) carry it.
DVD.
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King Kong Escapes (1967, Honda Ishirô)

Charming Toho (paired with Rankin-Bass) KING KONG features a lot of homage to the original, great villains, appealing romantic leads (albeit chaste ones because 1967 and interracial romance), and an excellent fight scenes. Drawbacks include bland white guy lead Rhodes Reason and the King Kong suit. Also Ifukube Akira’s self-derivative score (reusing classic GODZILLA themes) though it too eventually is charming-ish. Goofy, but all right.
None.
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Paris Blues (1961, Martin Ritt)
★★
Joanne Woodward and Diahann Carroll are American tourists in Paris who meet expat jazz musicians Paul Newman and Sidney Poitier. They pair off on color lines (a change from the source novel, where Newman’s character romances Carroll’s); the men grapple with possibly returning to the States with their new ladies while still trying to hit it big. Bad script and often inert direction from Ritt does it in. A real missed opportunity; wastes the cast.
DVD, Blu-ray.
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The Incredible Hulk (2008, Louis Leterrier), the extended version
★★

Fan-made extended version–putting in deleted scenes to flesh things out to star and uncredited co-writer Edward Norton’s original intent–suffers from most of the theatrical version’s problems, but does give Norton a much better arc before he bows out to let the CG take over. Some great stuff for him and love interest Liv Tyler. It’s sad the film won’t ever get an official revision, as fan attempts show potential incredibleness. The CG end’s still bunk.
None.
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🍿
Irreversible (2012, David Levinson)
Not Recommended

Short film with a reverse order narrative gimmick and nothing else. The story–about asshole Timothy Paul Driscoll dumping girlfriend Alice Hunter–is terrible. Writer/director Levinson seems utterly unaware his protagonist’s loathsome.
Streaming.
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Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005, Shane Black)
★★★
Black comedy about thief Robert Downey Jr. masquerading as an actor and getting wrapped up in a noir-ish L.A. conspiracy. Val Kilmer’s sort of the hard-boiled P.I., Michelle Monaghan’s sort of the femme fatale. Great performance from Downey and phenomenally constructed script from director Black enable the whole thing. Kilmer and Monaghan are both excellent as well. The film takes itself a little too seriously (and Black’s got some willfully unpleasant tangents in addition to his insightful genre deconstruction).
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Japón (2002, Carlos Reygadas)
ⓏⒺⓇⓄ
Suicidal Alejandro Ferretis–he’s got a bad leg–travels to a rural area to do the deed, then meets an older woman (Magdalena Flores) and decides life’s worth living so long as she gets jiggy with him. Pretentious, self-indulgent, long. So long. Reygadas’s uneven direction is at least better than the script; the all-amateur cast is far from impressive.
DVD, Blu-ray.
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Joint Security Area (2000, Park Chan-wook)
ⓏⒺⓇⓄ
Ineptly executed decent idea–soldiers on either side of the Korean border becoming pals and how wrong things go. Park sentimentalizes more than directs. Some of the acting makes it bearable, though far from all of it.
DVD.
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L.A. Confidential (1997, Curtis Hanson)
★½
Middling (at best), “handsome,” Oscar-bait adaptation of James Ellroy corrupt cops novel set in early fifties L.A.. Good performance from Russell Crowe and a great one from Kevin Spacey can’t make up for ineffective lead Guy Pearce, risibily bad Kim Basinger turn as femme fatale, or director Hanson and Brian Helgeland’s disjointed script. It also underuses David Straithairn, which ought to be a crime.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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The Lower Depths (1936, Jean Renoir)
★★½
Problematic, reductive adaptation of Maxim Gorky play about residents of Russian flophouse and their successes and failures trying to get out of poverty. Great performances from Jean Gabin and Louis Jouvet, but director Renoir loses track of the film when away from them.
DVD.
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The Man in the Iron Mask (1998, Randall Wallace)
★★
Fun adventure has Leonardo DiCaprio as twins–one good, one bad–but really it’s just an excuse to do OLD MAN THREE MUSKETEERS with Jeremy Irons, John Malkovich, and Gerard Depardieu (Gabriel Byrne’s fourth wheel D’Artagnan). Excellent performances from the Musketeers–with Irons and Malkovich always erring on the right side of ham–and Byrne’s got some good moments. DiCaprio’s okay enough; it helps he’s not in the movie very much.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Matewan (1987, John Sayles)
★½
Strangely simplistic take on a 1920s West Virginia coal miners work stoppage. The film’s jumbo scale gets away from director Sayles in the script so he relies way too heavily on caricature. Great performances from Chris Cooper, Mary McDonnell, and David Strathairn. Very disappointing.
DVD.
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The Missouri Breaks (1976, Arthur Penn)
★★★★
Singular Western pits rustler-turned-farmer Jack Nicholson against mercenary Marlon Brando. Exceptional on most fronts, including Penn’s direction, Nicholson’s performance, and the John Williams score. Brando’s good too, he’s just not Nicholson.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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My Name is Nobody (1973, Tonino Valerii)
★★½
Fun but creatively lazy comedy Western about aging lawman Henry Fonda teaming up with amateur gunslinger Terence Hill to take on “The Wild Bunch.” Sergio Leone came up with the story, produced the picture in some uncredited but important capacity, and even directed some scenes. Or just one. He can’t doesn’t save it. In addition to the wonky narrative, the film gets way too preachy about the end of the Old West.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Night Moves (1975, Arthur Penn)
★★★★
Superlative mystery drama about L.A. private investigator Gene Hackman going to Florida on a case (to avoid his crumbling marriage to Susan Clark) and getting mixed up with stunt men, smuggling, and Jennifer Warren. Young Melanie Griffith is the missing person in the initial case. Exceptional performances from Hackman and Warren. Clark’s real good too. Penn’s direction and Alan Sharp’s script are both phenomenal. There’s nothing else like it; one of the best American films of the 1970s.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Olga’s Chignon (2002, Jérôme Bonnell)
★★★½
Patient, deliberate drama about a family coping with the mother’s death. Only the wrap-up is uneven; an excellent debut from writer-director Bonnell.
DVD.
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Over the Rainbow (2002, Ahn Jin-woo)
★★½
Romantic drama about a weather guy (Lee Jung-jae) trying to rediscover his past after a car accident leaves him with partial amnesia. Part of that rediscovery involves old friend (Jang Jin-young). Good performances from Lee and Jang–an outstanding one from Jang–make up for the third act problems and some general confusion involving the film’s extensive flashbacks.
DVD (R3).
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The Philadelphia Story (1940, George Cukor)
★★½
Just okay class comedy gets by on Cary Grant’s considerable charm as he tries to win ex-wife Katharine Hepburn back before she gets married again. Thin characters and stagy adaptation limit Hepburn most (Jimmy Stewart’s manifestly miscast). The rushed finish doesn’t help things either. Some nice direction from Cukor, though never in the pacing.
DVD (R3).
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Safety Last! (1923, Fred C. Newmeyer and Sam Taylor)
★★★½
Outstanding comedy has Lloyd going from store clerk to “Human Fly” as he tries to make it in New York City. Superb physical antics from Harold Lloyd; the film ends with his breathtaking attempt to scale as twelve-story building. Also a very accessible silent film for newbies
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Sea of Love (1989, Harold Becker)
★★★★
Beautifully written (by Richard Price) mystery has Al Pacino as a bachelor cop who tries to catch a killer who picks his victims through a dating service. Ellen Barkin is the date who becomes more than part of the job. Phenomenal performances from Pacino, Barkin, and John Goodman; great use of the New York City locations.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Caught in a Ham (2019, Miguel Jiron)
Not Recommended
Initially amusing, highly derivative (but in a homage-y sense) spin-off of a SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE character (Spider-Ham–an anthropomorphic “funny animal” Spider-Man variant) unfortunately serves as a prequel to that movie instead of a vehicle for Spider-Ham.
DVD, Blu-ray.
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The Shadow (1994, Russell Mulcahy)


★★★

After a silly opening, this 1930s-set adaptation of the 1930s pulp vigilante gets real good, real fast. Masterful script (from David Koepp), great cast (save Jonathan Winters), and some strong direction from Mulcahy. Lovebirds Alec Baldwin and Penelope Ann Miller have plenty of chemistry, as do Baldwin and nemesis John Lone.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Sling Blade (1996, Billy Bob Thornton), the director’s cut
★½
Sometimes lovely film about developmentally disabled Thornton (who stars, writes, directs) getting out of the mental hospital he’s been in since killing his mother and her lover as a child. He soon bonds with 12-year old Lucas Black, who’s experiencing his own traumas. Way too long, way too many montages. Embarrasing-to-the-production bad performance from Dwight Yoakam. Daniel Lanois’s music is almost as bad. Otherwise, well-acted and well-executed.
DVD.
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Sneakers (1992, Phil Alden Robinson)
★★★
Delightful comedic thriller has Robert Redford leading a group of high tech security experts who run afoul of Redford’s old hippie pal/nemesis Ben Kingsley. Great performances throughout (from an awesome, varied supporting cast), wonderful direction from Robinson, and a lovely, playful James Horner score. 126 minutes of expertly executed fun.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Speak (2004, Jessica Sharzer)
★★½
Pretty good young adult novel adaptation with a great performance from Kristen Stewart and some strong direction from Sharzer. The short running time hurts it.
DVD, Streaming.
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The Spies (1957, Henri-Georges Clouzot)
★★★½
Gérard Séty runs a failing psychiatric hospital and agrees to hide mysterious Curd Jürgens (for a fee). The hospital is then overrun by spies from both East and West, complicating things. All the acting is good; Séty is excellent. Very complex script, superiorly navigated by Clouzot’s direction.
DVD (R2).
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Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982, Nicholas Meyer), the director’s edition
★★★★
Layered, complex TREK outing has William Shatner and company dealing with aging in the 23rd century, but also with Ricardo Montalban returning (from the original show) and going after the good guys. Beautifully produced, with fantastic direction, and a gorgeous James Horner score. Excellent acting from pretty much everyone.
DVD, Blu-ray.
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Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984, Leonard Nimoy)
★★½
Well-made but problematically scripted sequel has William Shatner and the gang galavanting across the galaxy to try to resurrect a fallen comrade. Along the way, the Klingons (led by an enthusiastic but underwhelming Christopher Lloyd) go after Shatner’s kid (Merritt Butrick, back from II) and Robin Curtis (taking over from II’s Kirstie Alley). It’s a messy narrative. Great direction from Nimoy though. And some nice work from the cast, particularly DeForest Kelley.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Superman II (1980, Richard Lester), the restored international cut

Fan attempt to recreate foreign television version, which includes multiple scenes directed by original SUPERMAN director Richard Donner (the films were initially shot back-to-back). There are wildly different tones, including Lester–presumably–doing sequences laughing at people in disaster scenes. The version does offer some good Lex Luthor (Gene Hackman) and Jimmy Olsen (Marc McClure) interaction (the only in the series) along with fleshing out of the Lois and Clark romance. But it doesn’t fix any of the narrative’s outstanding problems. The original R.I.C. was traded online until Warner Bros. shut it down–after corporate sibling “Entertainment Weekly” did an article praising the fan effort–so no home video availability.

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Love Exists (1960, Maurice Pialat)
Highly Recommended
Director Pialat’s “tour” of Parisian suburbia, with Jean-Loup Reynold voicing the first-person narration. Covers Pialat’s childhood, the socioeconomic realities of the present, and some other features as well. Beautifully shot in black and white by Gilbert Sarthre. Superior twenty minutes. None.
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They’re a Weird Mob (1966, Michael Powell)

Rather bad comedy about Italian immigrant Walter Chiari moving to Australia. The acting is actually fine, it’s the script (by director Powell’s long-time partner Emeric Pressburger–under a pseudonym). May have been responsible for kicking off the Australian film industry? But otherwise, a big stinker.
DVD (R4).
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Thieves Like Us (1974, Robert Altman)
★★★★
Wonderful gem of a movie romance (between Keith Carradine and Shelley Duvall) amid a 1930s-set crime drama. Will Carradine pick a life of bank robbing or listen to Duvall and go straight. Great performances from all involved and Altman’s direction excels in the setting. Screenplay by Calder Willingham, Joan Tewkesbury and Altman.
DVD, Blu-ray.
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36 Quai des Orfèvres (2004, Olivier Marchal)
★½
Sometimes quite good cop movie about good cop Daniel Auteuil and good-but-complicated cop Gérard Depardieu jockeying for the same promotion and both becoming morally compromised (or worse). Loses its footing more and more as things progress. Auteuil’s good, Depardieu’s awesome, but they can’t save the film from director Marchal or the script.
DVD.
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The Three Musketeers (1993, Stephen Herek)
ⓏⒺⓇⓄ

Graphically violent–but still PG–Disney adaptation boasts a shockingly good performance from Charlie Sheen, an appealing one from Oliver Platt, and a good villain turn from Michael Wincott but it’s otherwise fairly dreadful. Bad direction and a bad script (from David Loughery); awful performance from Chris O’Donnell (as D’Artagnan). Kiefer Sutherland tries and fails. Tim Curry’s a caricature of himself. It’s the pits.
DVD, Streaming.
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Tremors (1990, Ron Underwood)
★★★
Isolated desert town–full of lovable goofballs (led by handymen Kevin Bacon and Fred Ward)–has to contend with giant killer worm monsters. Great acting (Gross’s survivalist redefined the actor), wonderfully paced script, excellent special effects. It’s loads of fun.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Triple Cross (1966, Terence Young)
★★
WWII espionage thriller has English thief Christopher Plummer convincing German captors wants to spy for them so he can go back to the UK and become a double agent for the British. Good performances compensate for a shallow script and medicore direction from Young.
DVD, Streaming.
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The Twilight Samurai (2002, Yamada Yôji)
★½
Widowed samurai Sanada Hiroyuki has given up the warrior life to take care of his kids. Then childhood love Miyazawa Rie comes to town and things start changing. Good performances–especially from Sanada–but the narrative’s disjointed and suffers from a constant lack of focus
DVD, Blu-ray.
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Turn (2001, Hirayama Hideyuki)

A young woman (Makise Riho) gets in a car accident and, when she wakes up, finds she’s the only person in an otherwise empty world. Or is she? Oh, she also repeats the same day over and over again. Likable performances, but the film concentrates way too hard on its fantastic situation and not its characters.
DVD (R2).
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28 Days Later (2002, Danny Boyle)
★★★★
Cillian Murphy wakes up from a coma to discover the world overrun by zombies and has to try to survive. Not just from the zombies, but also from the military. Visually stunning, with Boyle shooting on DV; great script by Alex Garland; excellent performances. Murphy makes an outstanding Everyman. The film has at least one alternate ending version; rating is for whatever is on the U.S. DVD release.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Versus (2000, Kitamura Ryuhei)

Technically magnificent action/horror picture has Sakaguchi Tak fighting zombies with a samurai sword while wearing an ultra cool black leather trenchcoat. The writing is always iffy, but Kitamura’s direction tends to compensate enough.
DVD, Streaming.
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Volcano (1997, Mick Jackson)

Nicely paced disaster movie about a volcano growing out the La Brea Tar Pits. Anne Heche is the scientist, Tommy Lee Jones is the city guy, Gaby Hoffman’s his daughter. It’s occasionally annoying, with bad dialogue, but the cast is great. Heche and Don Cheadle are outstanding; Jones is fine. The film takes itself just seriously enough, which is not much.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Wallace and Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005, Nick Park and Steve Box)
★★★½
First and only full-length theatrical outing for director Park and his clay animated creations Wallace and Gromit. It’s a great expansion of the duo’s adventures, but one is kind of okay. The clay animation and writing are exceptional work, as always, from Park and company.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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White Dog (1982, Samuel Fuller)
★★★½
Somewhat infamous film–studio Paramount shelved it before release due to controversy about the subject (cutesy star Kristy MacNichol adopts an awesome new dog, only to discover he’s been trained to attack Black people) and director Fuller stole a print and bounced to Europe to get it released somewhere at least. The film runs short, leaving a few too many plot threads untied, but it’s real good. It’s deliberative and thoughtful, nicely directed by Fuller, with strong performances from the four principals. Nice to see Paul Winfield lead a movie. Finally available officially, on DVD and Blu-ray (but from Criterion, not Paramount).

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White Nights (1985, Taylor Hackford)
★★½
Not entirely ludicrous tale of defector ballet dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov (played by defector ballet dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov) crash-landing in the Soviet Union and being forced into a cover-up involving Vietnam-era, tap dancing defector Gregory Hines. Phenomenal dance sequences occasionally get a little long (with Baryshnikov the more impressive). But Hines’s performance is easily the best. The Lionel Ritchie Oscar-winning song is a little much.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Perry Mason: The Case of the Lethal Lesson (1989, Christian I. Nyby II)
ⓏⒺⓇⓄ
Quintessential middling TV movie has Mason (Raymond Burr) teaching law school and his star pupil (William R. Moses, ingloriously replacing William Katt as the series’ blond P.I.) falsely accused of murder. Way too little Burr (he’s good when he’s around), way, way too little Barbara Hale. Moses’s arc involves his rich girl-poor boy romance with boundlessly annoying Alexandra Paul. They’ve got zero chemistry, which is mostly Moses’s fault though the direction and script are also weak. But, hey, could be worse. Followed by THE CASE OF THE MUSICAL MURDER.
DVD.
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Perry Mason: The Case of the Lady in the Lake (1988, Ron Satlof)
ⓏⒺⓇⓄ
Poorly written, poorly directed PERRY MASON entry has Raymond Burr defending David Hasselhoff, which ought to have some kind of absurd value but doesn’t. Burr’s great (in lousy courtroom scenes), Hasselhoff’s atrocious (worse, it’s a try and fail not a don’t try and fail). Okay support from regulars Barbara Hale and William Katt. Hale’s not in it enough; it’s Katt’s last PERRY MASON. Great performance from Audra Lindley in the guest stars; pretty much everyone else is lousy. Though David Ogden Stiers has some good moments. Title’s way too long too. Followed by THE CASE OF THE LETHAL LESSON.
DVD.
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The MacKintosh Man (1973, John Huston)
ⓏⒺⓇⓄ
A miscast Paul Newman (he’s a British spy posing as an Australian for a bunch of the movie) tries to take down corrupt politician James Mason. Huston’s direction dilly-dallies and lolly-gags when it’s not dawdling. The script (credited solely to Walter Hill, who swears it’s not his fault) is bad. Newman having zero chemistry with female lead Dominique Sanda doesn’t help either. And the Maurice Jarre music is too slight. An unfortunate misfire, especially given those involved.
DVD, Streaming.
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Encore (1951, Pat Jackson, Anthony Pelissier, and Harold French)
★★★
Last (after QUARTET and TRIO) and most successful entry in trilogy of anthologies of W. Somerset Maugham adaptations. Three stories, all of them well-directed, at least one of them well-written, and all of them rather well-acted even when the writing’s not there. Great performances from Nigel Patrick, Roland Culver, Glynis Johns, and others. Maugham pointlessly and charmlessly introduces each story, which sometimes gets things off on the wrong foot.
DVD (R2), Streaming.
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Godzilla, King of Monsters! (1956, Terry O. Morse and Honda Ishirô)
ⓏⒺⓇⓄ
Unfortunate Americanization of the original Japanese GODZILLA adds dubbing and Raymond Burr to the story of a nuclear-powered monster destroying Japan. The whole atom bomb metaphor gets shucked; the script is bad, the shoehorning of Burr is bad (in writing, performance, and direction). See the original. Skip this one. Even if you have nostalgia.
DVD, Blu-ray, Streaming.
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Trio (1950, Ken Annakin and Harold French)
★★
Second (after QUARTET) in a trilogy of anthologies adapting W. Somerset Maugham short stories has good acting, okay writing, and some excellent direction (from Annakin not French) but just doesn’t quite work out due to its lopsided attentions. Maugham introduces the stories, sometimes getting cut off mid-sentence, which is sort of funny, sort of not. Followed by ENCORE.
DVD (R2), Streaming.
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Frankenstein Unbound (1990, Roger Corman)
★★½
After destroying the future trying to save the environment, scientist John Hurt goes into the past where he finds the events of Frankenstein (the novel) unfolding around him, with Mary Shelley (Bridget Fonda) witnessing Dr. Frankenstein’s descent into madness. Raul Julia’s an amazing Frankenstein, Nick Brimble’s an amazing monster. Hurt’s a tad passive but very affable. He and Fonda sell their May-December romance. Nice direction, excellent music, lovely Italian locations, good special effects. Based on a Brian Aldiss novel.
DVD.
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Might not Hopefully

If I had Visual Reflux set up a little differently, I’d really easily be able to go back and look to see the last time I was getting my daily posts done. It’s been a while. Longer than when I was sick and I’ve been sick a week; out of commission two and a half days, maybe two and three quarters days. The day I slammed Hiball to try to stay conscious was a bad one, even if I was technically functioning.

But falling off the daily wagon didn’t start with the sick. I feel like it was that big MCU post, which got a whopping seven hits. I’m not sure how many it would’ve gotten over at Stop Button but definitely more than seven. Though maybe not. For all the energy I put into the “Sum Up” posts at Stop Button, only the John Carpenter and Eleanor Parker ones were ever popular as far as hits. Might be why I lost interest in doing them and instead just call anything long form a “Sum Up” now. Like the microcast I meant to do daily and haven’t done since… Tuesday? I tried today but kept getting distracted.

I’m preoccupied. Like, big time. And I’ve been avoiding acknowledging it, even though it’s been “around” for a while now. It was a predicted preoccupation so I thought I’d compartmentalized enough to get around it but no. There’s only so much one can do to prepare for anything. And this one hit me.

I’m hoping this bit of acknowledgement will help me get things back in gear. Maybe start small, like a post a day for a week. Shouldn’t be too hard since I’ve got five more issues of Punisher to write about and the Visual Reflux podcast. It’ll also help not being dreadfully ill.

The big hope, as the week starts tomorrow, is keeping the depression in check. Preoccupation stress and anxiety leads pretty quick to a depression spiral for me. Always has. I’m old now so I’ve got all sorts of tools, both recommended ones and the tricks I’ve learned about myself over the years; just need to remember to use them. I’ve got a really weird project I’m going to do this week, but it might actually prove rewarding. Might. But not hopefully.