Right hand meet left hand

Back in MFA school, I was watching a lot of movies over again. Sea of Love, Sling Blade, Gone in Sixty Seconds are the main examples just because Stop Button still has the posts. I remember talking in class about how it didn’t seem like Billy Bob Thornton actually realized what he did with Sling Blade and so it screwed up the film, which got into whether or not a creative could not realize what they were doing with their creation.

The mid-aughts were a weird time for indie film breaking out. If you missed it in the nineties, you were still able to catch up. Most of the people who made excellent films then were still making movies, even if they were Broken Flowers and not Ghost Dog. So I got some push back from classmates but then agreement from the instructor. You can make a thing and have no idea what you made.

So seeing Endgame co-writer Christopher Markus disagree on how time travel works in the movie? Not a surprise. What else would you expect from the guy who wrote Dark World? But it also shows just how smoothly Kevin Feige keeps the trains running; on a Feige production, you can apparently fundamentally disagree with your other creatives with no negative result to the end product.

Basically Feige is the guy J.J. Abrams always wanted to be but couldn’t.

Avengers: Endgame’s Directors and Writers Disagree on the Ending
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Presenting the New Team!

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Until Batman, I was a Marvel kid. Much to my father’s dismay. I had all the Spider-Man books, I got Captain America (because he was “The Captain” because Reagan had pissed him off or something and even at ten I knew fuck Ronald Reagan), but I don’t know what else. Not X-Men. Maybe Hulk? I probably got Hulk.

So in winter 1988/1989 when Avengers #300 came out, I was pretty excited. It was an all-new Avengers team, The Captain, Thor, Mister Fantastic and Invisible Woman, and Gilgamesh. I don’t know why Gilgamesh. Because someone at Marvel who moonlighted at the Strand secretly knew there were some dumb kids out there who’d buy a used copy of Gilgamesh just because of a comic.

I mean, give me a better reason.

I did the Marvel summer crossovers when I was a kid; Secret Wars—especially it being sold in toy stores—trained me. But I didn’t make it to Marvel’s 1989 crossover. Summer 1989 happened and I became a Batman reader and then just a DC reader.

But one of the things about Avengers over the years was the book could support some wacky teams. Scott Mendelson talks about how Avengers 5 could conceivably team-up Brie Larson, Chadwick Boseman, Tom Holland, Benedict Cumberbatch, Paul Rudd, and Evangeline Lilly. Plus maybe Tessa Thompson or Anthony Mackie. Presumably Mark Ruffalo will be in it because he’s given up on range. It’s a good post from Mendelson, who remains the only box office guru person I read.

Would you get equally excited about a Black Panther/Captain Marvel/Spider-Man/Valkryie team-up movie?

Mendelson says three years from now for Avengers 5. Okay. So what about the one six years from now. Disney seems to appreciate Kevin Feige; he’s peerless in what he does. So there will be an Avengers 6, right?

Presumably Fantastic Four will have hit by then, Chris Evans might be ready to come out of whatever “retirement” he’s done (he’ll probably follow Chris Pine to TV but maybe streaming), Chris Hemsworth will have bombed out on his third franchise attempt. But who could play Gilgamesh?

Tony Stella’s “Endgame” Poster

What if it’s the Rock. What if Justice League 2 starring all the popular heroes versus the Rock bombs and the Rock goes to Marvel.

I mean. He was really good in Moana so why not bring that character over into the MCU. If Disney/MCU is that far along, I mean.

In case you needed a reminder he’s the best Chris

Chris Evans was, in his youth, a Burton/Keaton Batman fan.

Wow, he’d make a terrible Batman.

Evans was always my outside Steve Rogers dream cast. The Matthew Lillard thing wasn’t going to happen, but should’ve, but anyway, Evans was a good job. By that time, he’d shown a rather good range. Johnny Storm, Sunshine, Street Kings as the straight man, Push as a Steve Rogers prototype, Losers. When you look at his post-Marvel filmography and after bump at the start, he’s slowed to stopped on non-Marvel output. Those initial efforts didn’t really do much (see trajectory of Chris Pine), though it looks like Evans has got a Netflix original movie, which will either be good or crap apparently (I still haven’t seen a Netflix original), and Rian Johnson’s upcoming “modern” Agatha Christie.

Evans has already settled in as the George Clooney of the MCU (though Evans is a lot more vocal with his good politics than Clooney is these days). Though he’s still a little young to start doing his “man-in-his-forties” parts. Of course, who knows where media will be in five years. Evans will be Doug Ross on Steven Spielberg’s six movie series “ER 2.0” on TV+ or some such thing.

I really need to do that Debbie Downer history of the MCU post.

Cap

Chris Evans may be iconic for playing Captain America — and a little infamous for his stint as the Human Torch — but his favorite childhood superhero might not be either of those guys.

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